My opinion on the latest television crossover event.

Amazing images from MondoCon. I would put most of these on my wall. Amazing images from MondoCon. I would put most of these on my wall. Amazing images from MondoCon. I would put most of these on my wall. Amazing images from MondoCon. I would put most of these on my wall.

Amazing images from MondoCon. I would put most of these on my wall.

Shelf of Shame 2014 continues with August and September’s titles: TRAINSPOTTING (1996) and ELEPHANT (2003). I really, really loved one and liked the other. Which did I prefer? Click the image above to find out.

Pretty neat making-of video about THE KEEP. Click on a very comfortable-looking Michael Mann to check it out on youtube.

This intoxicating. Edgar Wright’s close-ups.

My 100+ Favorite Movies of All Time. Spurred on by Cody Lang of the Intercut Film Podcast, I took on a challenge I hadn’t met since my early college days in 2003. I’ve seen many movies since then, and my tastes haven’t changed as much as they have been enlightened. I suppose I really had no business making a “Top 100” list when I was 20 years old and a relatively young cinephile-not-yet-filmmaker, and I probably have no business making this list now as a 31-year-old independent filmmaker, but man, it’s fun. The ranking here is almost entirely arbitrary and my preferences could change while I type this sentence.

Essentially this list attempts to organize all the films I’ve seen that I consider to be 5/5 or A+ or 10/10 or whatever the preferred grade is.

Hopefully the list continues to grow as I continue to be drawn deeper and deeper into the wonderful history and future of film.

The list is in spreadsheet form here.

We’re making “dinosaurs” the theme of our baby room, so I designed some characters to go on custom curtains and wall art. All credit to my wife for having the idea. I call these guys The Terribly Humble Lizards.

A Mann Walks Into a Bar: In MANHUNTER, Michael Mann uses framing to illustrate the growing realization at the heart of the movie. Hero Will Graham (William Peterson) is on a hunt for a killer that is reminding him of his talent for being able to think like a killer. When he first recalls his latest catch, Hannibal Lector, he’s framed in front of green blinds that make vertical bars. When he reluctantly visits Lector to get the murderer’s perspective on the new killings, Graham’s framing is nestled inside a box, from the POV of the unseen Lector. As the scene develops and Lector grows aware of he and Graham’s common state of mind, their reverse angles grow closer to center, until Graham is as imprisoned as the convict. Graham rushes from the room, trying to escape the idea that he has the capability of thinking like a serial killer, and Mann’s framing doesn’t do much for him: He’s still surrounded by bars, imprisoned by the guilt of knowing who he really is, and who he could be.This framing was called to my attention by Ben Flanagan of Aspect Radio, a fellow Mann Fann. A Mann Walks Into a Bar: In MANHUNTER, Michael Mann uses framing to illustrate the growing realization at the heart of the movie. Hero Will Graham (William Peterson) is on a hunt for a killer that is reminding him of his talent for being able to think like a killer. When he first recalls his latest catch, Hannibal Lector, he’s framed in front of green blinds that make vertical bars. When he reluctantly visits Lector to get the murderer’s perspective on the new killings, Graham’s framing is nestled inside a box, from the POV of the unseen Lector. As the scene develops and Lector grows aware of he and Graham’s common state of mind, their reverse angles grow closer to center, until Graham is as imprisoned as the convict. Graham rushes from the room, trying to escape the idea that he has the capability of thinking like a serial killer, and Mann’s framing doesn’t do much for him: He’s still surrounded by bars, imprisoned by the guilt of knowing who he really is, and who he could be.This framing was called to my attention by Ben Flanagan of Aspect Radio, a fellow Mann Fann. A Mann Walks Into a Bar: In MANHUNTER, Michael Mann uses framing to illustrate the growing realization at the heart of the movie. Hero Will Graham (William Peterson) is on a hunt for a killer that is reminding him of his talent for being able to think like a killer. When he first recalls his latest catch, Hannibal Lector, he’s framed in front of green blinds that make vertical bars. When he reluctantly visits Lector to get the murderer’s perspective on the new killings, Graham’s framing is nestled inside a box, from the POV of the unseen Lector. As the scene develops and Lector grows aware of he and Graham’s common state of mind, their reverse angles grow closer to center, until Graham is as imprisoned as the convict. Graham rushes from the room, trying to escape the idea that he has the capability of thinking like a serial killer, and Mann’s framing doesn’t do much for him: He’s still surrounded by bars, imprisoned by the guilt of knowing who he really is, and who he could be.This framing was called to my attention by Ben Flanagan of Aspect Radio, a fellow Mann Fann. A Mann Walks Into a Bar: In MANHUNTER, Michael Mann uses framing to illustrate the growing realization at the heart of the movie. Hero Will Graham (William Peterson) is on a hunt for a killer that is reminding him of his talent for being able to think like a killer. When he first recalls his latest catch, Hannibal Lector, he’s framed in front of green blinds that make vertical bars. When he reluctantly visits Lector to get the murderer’s perspective on the new killings, Graham’s framing is nestled inside a box, from the POV of the unseen Lector. As the scene develops and Lector grows aware of he and Graham’s common state of mind, their reverse angles grow closer to center, until Graham is as imprisoned as the convict. Graham rushes from the room, trying to escape the idea that he has the capability of thinking like a serial killer, and Mann’s framing doesn’t do much for him: He’s still surrounded by bars, imprisoned by the guilt of knowing who he really is, and who he could be.This framing was called to my attention by Ben Flanagan of Aspect Radio, a fellow Mann Fann. A Mann Walks Into a Bar: In MANHUNTER, Michael Mann uses framing to illustrate the growing realization at the heart of the movie. Hero Will Graham (William Peterson) is on a hunt for a killer that is reminding him of his talent for being able to think like a killer. When he first recalls his latest catch, Hannibal Lector, he’s framed in front of green blinds that make vertical bars. When he reluctantly visits Lector to get the murderer’s perspective on the new killings, Graham’s framing is nestled inside a box, from the POV of the unseen Lector. As the scene develops and Lector grows aware of he and Graham’s common state of mind, their reverse angles grow closer to center, until Graham is as imprisoned as the convict. Graham rushes from the room, trying to escape the idea that he has the capability of thinking like a serial killer, and Mann’s framing doesn’t do much for him: He’s still surrounded by bars, imprisoned by the guilt of knowing who he really is, and who he could be.This framing was called to my attention by Ben Flanagan of Aspect Radio, a fellow Mann Fann. A Mann Walks Into a Bar: In MANHUNTER, Michael Mann uses framing to illustrate the growing realization at the heart of the movie. Hero Will Graham (William Peterson) is on a hunt for a killer that is reminding him of his talent for being able to think like a killer. When he first recalls his latest catch, Hannibal Lector, he’s framed in front of green blinds that make vertical bars. When he reluctantly visits Lector to get the murderer’s perspective on the new killings, Graham’s framing is nestled inside a box, from the POV of the unseen Lector. As the scene develops and Lector grows aware of he and Graham’s common state of mind, their reverse angles grow closer to center, until Graham is as imprisoned as the convict. Graham rushes from the room, trying to escape the idea that he has the capability of thinking like a serial killer, and Mann’s framing doesn’t do much for him: He’s still surrounded by bars, imprisoned by the guilt of knowing who he really is, and who he could be.This framing was called to my attention by Ben Flanagan of Aspect Radio, a fellow Mann Fann. A Mann Walks Into a Bar: In MANHUNTER, Michael Mann uses framing to illustrate the growing realization at the heart of the movie. Hero Will Graham (William Peterson) is on a hunt for a killer that is reminding him of his talent for being able to think like a killer. When he first recalls his latest catch, Hannibal Lector, he’s framed in front of green blinds that make vertical bars. When he reluctantly visits Lector to get the murderer’s perspective on the new killings, Graham’s framing is nestled inside a box, from the POV of the unseen Lector. As the scene develops and Lector grows aware of he and Graham’s common state of mind, their reverse angles grow closer to center, until Graham is as imprisoned as the convict. Graham rushes from the room, trying to escape the idea that he has the capability of thinking like a serial killer, and Mann’s framing doesn’t do much for him: He’s still surrounded by bars, imprisoned by the guilt of knowing who he really is, and who he could be.This framing was called to my attention by Ben Flanagan of Aspect Radio, a fellow Mann Fann. A Mann Walks Into a Bar: In MANHUNTER, Michael Mann uses framing to illustrate the growing realization at the heart of the movie. Hero Will Graham (William Peterson) is on a hunt for a killer that is reminding him of his talent for being able to think like a killer. When he first recalls his latest catch, Hannibal Lector, he’s framed in front of green blinds that make vertical bars. When he reluctantly visits Lector to get the murderer’s perspective on the new killings, Graham’s framing is nestled inside a box, from the POV of the unseen Lector. As the scene develops and Lector grows aware of he and Graham’s common state of mind, their reverse angles grow closer to center, until Graham is as imprisoned as the convict. Graham rushes from the room, trying to escape the idea that he has the capability of thinking like a serial killer, and Mann’s framing doesn’t do much for him: He’s still surrounded by bars, imprisoned by the guilt of knowing who he really is, and who he could be.This framing was called to my attention by Ben Flanagan of Aspect Radio, a fellow Mann Fann.

A Mann Walks Into a Bar: In MANHUNTER, Michael Mann uses framing to illustrate the growing realization at the heart of the movie. Hero Will Graham (William Peterson) is on a hunt for a killer that is reminding him of his talent for being able to think like a killer. When he first recalls his latest catch, Hannibal Lector, he’s framed in front of green blinds that make vertical bars. When he reluctantly visits Lector to get the murderer’s perspective on the new killings, Graham’s framing is nestled inside a box, from the POV of the unseen Lector. As the scene develops and Lector grows aware of he and Graham’s common state of mind, their reverse angles grow closer to center, until Graham is as imprisoned as the convict. Graham rushes from the room, trying to escape the idea that he has the capability of thinking like a serial killer, and Mann’s framing doesn’t do much for him: He’s still surrounded by bars, imprisoned by the guilt of knowing who he really is, and who he could be.

This framing was called to my attention by Ben Flanagan of Aspect Radio, a fellow Mann Fann.

My current top 10 of 2014. I thought it’d be good to put this out there now before the awards season starts, because I doubt it’ll look like this at all by the time January rolls around. Or maybe it will, if baby Penelope decides I’m done watching movies for a while!